Tag Archives: Tendonitis

The inflammation of a tendon is known as tendonitis. This condition occurs when an individual overuses or injures a tendon. For instance, this happens often in athletics.  Practice Overview

It usually occurs due to an acute injury with swelling. It typically impacts the knees, wrist, finger, elbow, thigh, and other areas of the body.

A person of any age can develop tendonitis. However, it is most common among adults who undertake significant sports activities. People who are older are vulnerable too as the tendons lose elasticity and weaken as a person ages.

Orthopedic Institute of the West, led by the accomplished board-certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brandon Gough, provides hip and knee surgery procedures to patients in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Arizona, and surrounding communities across the horizon.

Key Highlights of Knee Tendonitis

  • Tendonitis typically occurs with overuse or injury leading to pressure on the tendons.
  • Knee tendonitis is also known as housemaid’s knee or jumper’s knee.
  • The treatment for this condition involves rest, ice and heat therapy, and OTC pain relievers.
  • In the absence of treatment, tendonitis can lead to a rupture which may require surgical intervention.

What is Tendonitis?

Tendonitis is a condition that involves painful swelling that usually occurs due to overuse. A tendon refers to a tissue that connects muscle to the bone. A tendon is tough, flexible, and fibrous and it can withstand pressure and tension. A ligament runs from bone to bone at a joint. In comparison, a tendon goes from muscle to bone.

Muscles and tendons work with each other to exert a pulling force. Ligaments and tendons are fibrous and tough. However, they are called soft tissue as they are softer in comparison with bone.

In case the sheath surrounding the tendon becomes swollen, instead of the tendon itself, it is known as tenosynovitis. Tendonitis can occur simultaneously with tenosynovitis.

Types of Tendonitis

Various types of tendonitis impact different areas of the body:

Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee)

Patellar tendonitis is a common injury or inflammation of the tendon that connects your kneecap (patella) to your shinbone (tibia). Your pain may be mild or severe.Anyone can get patellar tendonitis. But it’s such a frequent injury of athletes, especially those who play volleyball and basketball, that it’s called jumper’s knee. Among recreational volleyball players, an estimated 14.4 percent have jumper’s knee. The prevalence is even higher for top professional athletes. An estimated 40 to 50 percent of elite volleyball players have jumper’s knee.

Achilles Tendonitis

The Achilles tendon lies between the calf muscle and the heel. Achilles tendonitis is a standard sports injury. It may occur due to ill-fitting shoes or shoes that do not offer proper support to the foot. It is more common among rheumatoid arthritis patients.

 

Supraspinatus Tendonitis

In supraspinatus tendonitis, the tendon located in the top of the shoulder joint becomes swollen. This leads to pain when there is movement in the arm, specifically when there is an upward movement.

Certain patients may experience pain upon lying on the impacted shoulder at night. If there are other affected tendons in the same region, the patient may be experiencing a rotator cuff syndrome.

 

Tennis or Golfer’s Elbow

A standard symptom of lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is the occurrence of pain on the outside of the elbow. The pain may also radiate down toward the wrist.

Medial epicondylitis (golfer’s elbow) is a condition which leads to pain on the inner side of the elbow. It occurs more commonly among avid golfers. The pain worsens when attempting to lift against a force. At times, the pain extends down to the wrist.

 

Devoted board certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brandon Gough receives patients from Phoenix, Scottsdale, Arizona, and other towns and cities in the golden state of Arizona for tendonitis.

For more information about hip and knee procedures and treatments by Arizona Board certified orthopedic surgeon, Brandon Gough, M.D., please click here or call us at 623-873-8565. Taking new patients in and around Phoenix, Scottsdale, Glendale, Tempe, Mesa and surrounding Arizona cities.

Tendonitis is swelling or irritation of a tendon which are the thick fibrous cords that connect the muscle and bone. This condition leads to pain and tenderness right outside the affected joint.frgt-300x288

Orthopedic Institute of the West, led by accomplished board-certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brandon Gough, provides hip and knee surgery to patients in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Arizona, and surrounding communities and towns in this stellar part the nation.

Types of Tendonitis

Tendonitis can develop in any tendon. However, it commonly occurs around the elbows, knees, shoulders, heels, and wrists. Following are some familiar names for the various types of tendonitis conditions:

  • Pitcher’s shoulder
  • Swimmer’s shoulder
  • Tennis elbow
  • Jumper’s knee
  • Golfer’s elbow

A majority of tendonitis cases can be adequately addressed with rest, medication, and physical therapy to decrease the pain. However, if the tendinitis is severe and causes a tendon to rupture, the patient may require surgery.

Causes

Tendonitis may occur due to a sudden injury. However, the development of this condition is more likely due to the repetitive movement of a specific joint over time. A majority of people develop tendonitis due to their work or hobbies involving repetitive movements which create pressure on the tendons.

It is crucial to use the correct technique, especially when undertaking repetitive motions in sports or work-related activities. The use of incorrect techniques can put excessive stress on the tendon. For instance, overloading the tendon can cause tennis elbow leading to tendonitis.

Diagnosis

The hip and knee surgeon usually diagnoses tendonitis during a physical examination of the patient. They may order imaging tests and x-rays as well, if necessary. This will help them rule out other conditions that may be leading to the patient’s symptoms.

Treatment

Tendonitis treatment aims to reduce the pain and inflammation that the patient is experiencing. Sometimes the patient only needs to rest, use cold compresses, and take over the counter medications to let the tendonitis resolve on its own without the need for any further treatment.  

Medications

The surgeon may recommend the following medications to treat tendonitis:

Pain Relievers

Naproxen sodium (Aleve), aspirin or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil, and others) may help offer relief from the pain and discomfort associated with tendinitis.  

Corticosteroids

At times, the doctor may inject a corticosteroid drug around a tendon to address the tendinitis. Cortisone injections decrease swelling and can help in relieving the pain.

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP)

In PRP treatment, a sample of the patient’s blood is taken and spun in a centrifuge to separate the platelets and other healing factors. This solution is then delivered via injections into the site of the chronic tendon irritation.

Physical Therapy

The patient may find a program of specific exercises developed to stretch and strengthen the impacted muscle and tendon to be useful. For example, the use of eccentric strengthening which focuses on the contraction of a muscle while it is lengthening has been proven to be a very successful treatment for various chronic tendon conditions. It is now used as the first line of treatment to address tendinitis.

Surgical and Other Procedures

In cases where physical therapy has been ineffective in relieving the symptoms of tendinitis, the doctor may recommend the following:

Dry Needling

In this procedure, the surgeon makes tiny holes in the tendon using a fine needle to encourage factors involved in the healing of the tendon.

Ultrasonic Treatment

This treatment is a minimally invasive one that involves placing a tiny incision to insert a special device that eliminates tendon scar tissue using ultrasonic sound waves.

Reliable board certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Brandon Gough receives patients from Phoenix, Scottsdale, Arizona, and other neighborhoods and communities in this part of Arizona for hip and knee surgery.

For more information about hip and knee procedures and treatments by Arizona Board certified orthopaedic surgeon, Brandon Gough, M.D., please click here or call us at 623-873-8565. Taking new patients in and around Phoenix, Scottsdale, Glendale, Tempe, Mesa and surrounding Arizona cities.

BrandonGough MD